Bil keane statue

Bil keane statue

A 36-foot ramada covers the statue, which includes plaques for those who made significant donations. A minimum of $75,000 was needed for the 18-month project; about $85,000 was raised, all privately.

Bil Keane ‘Family Circus’ cartoon from the 1960s. Copyright holder King Features Syndicate. Fair use of low-resolution copyrighted image run significantly smaller than the original. Fair-use rationale: No other copyright-free illustration is available.

Bil keane statue

Few things in life are immortal, but in the cartoon world, the strip that approaches immortality more than any other is The Family Circus. Drawn by its creator Bil Keane, The Family Circus describes the life most people in America (not to mention people in many other parts of the world) have experienced. It is warm-hearted, yet spot on in bringing to life the foibles that all families share. It evokes memories of yesterday, yet remains as current today as ever.

Bil keane statue

A bronze statue of the late cartoonist Bil Keane that will be dedicated in November at Scottsdale’s McCormick-Stillman Railroad Park along with a pavilion is one step closer toward completion.

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Scottsdale officials say the 9-by-7-foot bronze statue planned for the park will be called "Gitty-up Daddy" and be the centerpiece of a 36-foot-wide covered pavilion. A potential museum is in the discussion phase and would showcase artifacts from Keane’s comic strip.

Each year, during the NCS Annual Reuben Awards Weekend, the Society honors the year’s outstanding achievements in all walks of the profession. The recipient of our profession’s highest honor, the Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year is chosen by a secret ballot of the members.

Bil keane statue

11 Fun Facts About The Family Circus

The chart features illustrated icons from dozens of different graphic novels from all around the world. Though you’ll recognize familiar sights like the bat signal from Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns and Spider Jerusalem from Transmetropolitan, they’ll be colored in a drab grey. Once you gently scratch off that monochrome outer layer, though, you’ll reveal a vibrant new image underneath.

Bil keane statue

Bil Keane

Keane was born in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania neighborhood of Crescentville and attended parochial school at St. William Parish and Northeast Catholic High School. While a schoolboy, he taught himself to draw by mimicking the style of the cartoons published in The New Yorker. His first cartoon was published on May 21, 1936 on the amateur page of the Philadelphia Daily News. While in high school, his in-comic signature was spelled "Bill Keane", but early in his career, he omitted the second L from his first name "to be distinctive".